BWW Discussion Meeting: Tuesday November 23rd 2020

Brown War Watch meets online every Tuesday at 7pm to discuss ongoing conflicts, developments in the military industrial complex, and pathways to peace.

All political and spiritual beliefs welcome, united in the quest for a more peaceful planet. End the Endless Wars!

Please email brownwarwatch@brown.edu for the Zoom link.

THIS WEEK’S TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION

The human costs of “the war on terror”
War crimes (WSJNBCNYT), civilian casualties (InterceptAirwars), and displaced peoples (NYT)

Discussion question: To what extent are we as citizens responsible for the war crimes committed by our governments, intelligence agencies, and militaries?

A Trump phenomenon or the status quo?
On the Trump administration relationship with Israel (NYTWashington Post) and Saudi Arabia (The NationPBS).
On the Obama administration relationship with Israel (Reuters) and Saudi Arabia (ReutersPolitico)

Discussion question: Is the portrayal of the uniqueness of Trump’s support for violent governments fact, fiction, or something in between?

Open floor – for any topic of discussion of concern or interest

BWW rewind: Minds not Missiles

What could be done if federal funds were diverted from the US war machine? About a year ago Brown War Watch along with the Watson institute at Brown hosted Co-chair of Massachusetts Peace action and MIT Molecular biology Professor Jonathan King to discuss exactly that. Check it out below:

BWW Discussion Meeting: Tuesday November 17th 2020

Brown War Watch meets online every Tuesday at 7pm to discuss ongoing conflicts, developments in the military industrial complex, and pathways to peace.

All political and spiritual beliefs welcome, united in the quest for a more peaceful planet. End the Endless Wars!

Please email brownwarwatch@brown.edu for the Zoom link.

THIS WEEK’S TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION

Ethiopia — NYT,  UNHCRUNNPRBBC

US Sanctions on Iran —   WSJMEE,  BBDN. And related: AXIOSNYTLWT

OPEN FLOOR DISCUSSION

Other Key Issues in focus: Political Crisis in Peru, the alarming end to the Western Sahara Ceasefire , Armenia-Azerbaijan resolution – and more.

BWW Film Screening & Discussion: No Vietnamese Ever Called Me N***** (1968)

A discussion of the film No Vietnamese Ever Called Me N—–, (1968) with Brown University Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies, Françoise Hamlin, hosted by Les Robinson, Brown War Watch Co-President and PhD Candidate in the Department of History at Brown.

While we are unable to include the movie here, an unrestored copy of the film can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KoYLR…

Brown University students can access the film here: https://brown.hosted.panopto.com/Pano…

Time Stamps Intro: 00:0006:53

Discussion: 07:3042:51

Summary of film: The unflinching 1968 documentary follows 400,000 protesters along their march from Harlem to the United Nations building as part of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam’s April 15, 1967, New York City march. Interwoven through the protest footage is an intimate interview with Black Vietnam war veterans that provides a radical perspective on the plight of returning Black G.I.s – disproportionately sent to fight the war overseas, returning home to a “Thank You” of continued racial and economic discrimination. Director David L. Weiss’ use of verité results in an electrifying portrait of Black anti-war protesters and veterans as they speak out about social protest, life in Harlem, and the connections between racism and war. The film captures the inextricable link between Black liberation and the anti-Vietnam war movement.

BWW Discussion Meeting: Tuesday November 10th 2020

Brown War Watch meets online every Tuesday at 7pm to discuss ongoing conflicts, developments in the military industrial complex, and pathways to peace.

All political and spiritual beliefs welcome, united in the quest for a more peaceful planet. End the Endless Wars!

Please email brownwarwatch@brown.edu for the Zoom link.

THIS WEEK’S TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION

The Global impact of the US election

The significance of Biden’s win for major countries.

Challenges Biden will face in foreign policy.

Russia’s stance on the election.

How US-Saudi relations may change.

Sanguine Defense Contractors

A return of Obama-era personnel – with extensive relations with The Blob

Other Key Issues: US-Saudi relations and the war in Yemen, Israel/Palestine, nuclear arms deals, climate change pressures, the shift from Trump’s approach of economic nationalism & unilateralism to one more grounded & supportive of international institutions & multilateralism, addressing strained alliances.

Increased hostilities within Ethiopia that threaten to destabilize the region
Links: NYTWSJAl Jazeera

Open floor discussion on topics of concern or interest.

Update: Bolivia

Great news from Bolivia! Despite strong arm intimidation and apparent voter suppression by the violent self appointed interim government, democracy has prevailed as Louis Arce wins the election.

In rough chronologically here are some sources and info on how we got to where we are now:

First for a bit of background, if you missed our event check out Bolivia on the Brink: Natural Resources, the War on Drugs, and the Future of Democracy, this provides great context of where Bolivia was going into and during the Morales presidency.

BWW, Watson, and CLACS presents Bolivia on the Brink

Next, a government overthrown, a story of US and OAS interference

The brutal slaughter of indigenous people by the Interim government

Reports of intimidation and voter suppression

Even still, thankfully, Louis Arce wins the election and the interim government peacefully steps down

Action Sheet: Bolivia

With unsettling signs emerging from Bolivia on election day (10/18/2020) – including militarized streets & intimidation of international observers –  we encourage the international community to keep their eyes steadfast on events there as democracy hangs in the balance.

If you’re wondering what you can do we’ve put together an action sheet that may help.

The action sheet contains info on who you can donate to, who to follow (on twitter) to keep up to speed with what’s happening, some sources to learn more, and a helpful tool to help you find the contact info for your reps in the house and senate. You can download a pdf that that includes hyperlinks below. Feel free to download and share!

If you just want the links without downloading the file they can be found below the download button.

Donate to:
Andean Information Network

Follow:
@AndeanInfoNet
@Vargas52
@BretGustafson
@BenDangl
@WOLA_org
@KawsachunNews

Listen and Watch:
Bolivia and Brazil at the
Crossroads


Reflecting on MAS’ Legacy and
Bolivia’s Future



Find contact information by
entering your zip code
here for the House,
and by sorting the table
here by State for the
Senate.

Panel: Bolivia on the Brink


Join Brown War Watch, The Watson Institute, and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean studies for a panel on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 at 1PM EST for a zoom panel about the upcoming Bolivian election.

The event is free and open to the public. To Register click here: https://brown.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_f3JOyZANS42qGNttkx9mDA

This panel, Bolivia on the Brink: Natural Resources, the War on Drugs, and the Future of Democracy, aims to spotlight the upcoming October 18th elections in Bolivia. Following the November 2019 coup, and multiple postponements of the election by the current unelected government – democracy in Bolivia is now in a precarious position. Hosted by CLACS at the Watson, BWW will moderate a discussion with experts on both the War on Drugs, and Bolivia’s vast natural gas resources – sites and motivation of long-term American interventionism and militarism. The panel will explore how US intervention has contributed to the current and tenuous state of democracy. The panel will discuss the social and economic contestations that led to the election of the Morales government in 2005, its 14 years in power, and the high stakes of the upcoming elections. 

More info on the amazing panelists:

Bret Gustafson is Associate Professor of Sociocultural Anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis. Gustafson’s work focuses on the anthropology of politics and the political, with a particular interest in Latin American social movements, state transformation, and the politics of development. His research has engaged Indigenous movements in both Bolivia and Guatemala. He is the author of, Bolivia in the Age of Gas, recently published by Duke University Press (September, 2020). In this new book, Gustafson explores how the struggle over natural gas has reshaped Bolivia, along with the rise, and ultimate fall, of the country’s first Indigenous-led government. Though grounded in the unique complexities of Bolivia, the volume argues that fossil-fuel political economies worldwide are central to the reproduction of militarism and racial capitalism. His first book, New Languages of the State: Indigenous Resurgence and the Politics of Knowledge in Bolivia (2009) was also published by Duke University Press. He is the co-editor of, Remapping Bolivia: Resources, Territory and Indigeneity in a Plurinational State (SAR Press, 2011), and Rethinking Intellectuals in Latin America (Vervuert, 2010). He has published in Latin American Perspectives, Anthropological Quarterly, Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology among other peer review scholarly journals.

Kathryn Ledebur is the director of Cochabamba-based policy think-tank, the Andean Information Network (AIN), and a visiting fellow at the University of Reading, UK. She is an expert on international drug policy, human rights, alternative coca and drug control strategies. Ledebur has written extensively for the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA) and North American Congress on Latin America (NACLA), and published in Stability: International Journal of Security & Development. AIN provides information and analysis to NGO colleagues, the media, and international policymakers on developments in Bolivia and the impact of U.S. government and European policies. Working closely with civil society organizations in Latin America and in the United States, AIN promotes policy dialogue and the development of pragmatic alternatives that address the underlying economic, social, political and cultural needs of Bolivia.

Les Robinson is a PhD Candidate in the Department of History, and Co-President of Brown War Watch.

If you have questions feel free to email us at Brownwarwatch@Brown.edu

Brown War Watch presents: No Vietnamese Ever Called Me N***** (1968)

Online Film Screening: Wednesday September 23rd 6.30pm

Discussion: approx. 7.40pm

PLEASE RSVP for the link : 

https://forms.gle/dVeMEJBrddvC2AtG8


The unflinching 1968 documentary film which confronts the interlocking of RACISM & WAR, among a plethora of other injustices that remain urgently contemporary. 

The film will be followed by a discussion with Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies, Dr Françoise Hamlin, hosted by Les Robinson, Brown War Watch Co-President and PhD Candidate in History.

NVECMN follows 400,000 protesters along their march from Harlem to the United Nations building as part of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam’s April 15, 1967, New York City march. Interwoven through the protest footage is an intimate interview with Black Vietnam war veterans that provides a radical perspective on the plight of returning Black G.I.s – disproportionately sent to fight the war overseas, returning home to a “Thank You” of continued racial and economic discrimination.

Director David L. Weiss’ use of verité results in an electrifying portrait of Black anti-war protesters and veterans as they speak out about social protest, life in Harlem, and the connections between racism and war. The film captures the inextricable link between Black liberation and the anti-Vietnam war movement.The event is co-sponsored by the Departments of History and American Studies.